ALBUM OF WEEK 34: JEOPARDY

I’ve been surprised by musical recommendations from people I’m just acquainted with via internet. It’s not new  I’m socializing with people through my computer. I’ve been attached to Internet and all the social apps since the very beginning, when chats were a threat to the real social life, and very bad things could happen to you. If there’s something I don’t lack of, by all means, is social life. Never had a problem, never will have difficulties in meeting new people. Two of my best friends were chatting pals more than 10 years ago, and I started being interested in certain character I shared my life with, for more than 5 years through a rock forum.

Truth is that the last network which works at the time of stepping further to the physical meeting has been Twitter.

There was something I checked which involved musical profiles but it’s boring and inaccurate and I quickly gave up. During the 2-3 weeks I checked this thing, I exchanged few mails with a guy who had similar tastes. He told me the last album he was hooked to was this Jeopardy, the debut album of this band named The Sound. I decided to give this guy a bow of trust, and checked the album immediately. And I did like it a lot, despite the fact that it’s far from the usual styles I’m familiarized with.

To start with, The Sound was a British band from the 80’s, which had lots in common with Echo & the Bunnymen, sharing this dark post-punk style quite depressive and distressing, with an important relevance of the synthesized keyboards. They didn’t achieve the popularity they deserved, and they’ve always been considered a cult band.

Seems that the leader, Adrian Borland,  was kind of depressive and tortured soul who tried to commit suicide several times until he finally threw himself to the tracks at Wimbledon Tube Station when he was 41, thus, songs such as I Can’t Escape Myself, Hour of Need or Words Fail Me have this pessimistic and desperate tone advancing his sick condition.

However in general terms, songs are quite dynamic and fast, catchy and easy listening and dancing. Heartland, Heyday and Resistance are insane, for instance, and Missiles, Jeopardy or Hour of Need are more atmospheric.

Listening to this post punk, reminds me I’ve recently been also listening to post hardcore bands, so perhaps this is a signal to dig further, and check other styles I’ve been rejecting all my life for being too dark. Perhaps I’ll start giving a try to Joy Division, The Smiths or The Cure when cold and rain come back, in the dark with a blanket. Who knows? I might become a late huge fan.

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